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HEARD IT THROUGH THE HOPVINE
Where in the world can you go to an outdoor market and find a craft beer stand featuring 11 taps? Why, Singapore, that curious island-city-state in upper Malaysia. Famous for its mostly English-speaking populace and “hawker” outdoor vast markets, Singapore is now home to some interesting craft beer hawkers, including The Good Beer Company and Smith Street Taps, featuring 11 fresh craft beers, including most recently Modern Times from San Diego. How is this possible? According to Brian Spencer, writing in The New York Times, Daniel Goh, 40, saw a need and filled it. And plenty of Singaporeans are supporting his efforts. Goh opened The Good Beer Company, featuring over 60 imported bottled craft beers mainly from the U.S. Demand resulted in the opening of Smith Street Taps next door, featuring 11 craft beers on draught. Goh was at first worried that the keg beers wouldn’t turn quickly enough, but he soon discovered that he could hardly keep the small kegs on for a day. Matt Walsh, head brewer at Modern Times, traveled to Singapore to see where his beer was going and was impressed. Another craft beer tap hawker had opened not far from Goh’s, featuring locally made beers. We’re sure that Anderson Valley Brewing’s Fal Allen’s six-year brewing residency in Singapore had something to do with it. Beer: the new international language…

Pete’s Wicked Ale founder Pete Slosberg is working with Hoppin’ Frog owner and brewer Fred Karm in Akron, Ohio, to create a beer that unofficially celebrates the 30th anniversary of the famed eponymous brew. Wicked Re-Pete 2X is a 10.4% abv brown ale that could be Pete’s Wicked on steroids. The original was once the second-best selling craft beer in the country. Slosberg sold to Gambrinus in 1998 for a reported $68 million, but the label withered and died. Pete has always been a passionate part of the brewing community despite the label’s demise and is a regular judge on the Celebrator Blind Tasting Panel. Look for the Wicked Re-Pete 2X to be released in April. And that’s no joke…

A cobra snake got a new lease on life after it was rescued by members of Snake Helpline (there is such a thing) from Nayahat in Odisha’s Puri district of India. The serpent was rushed to the Veterinary College of Odisha University, where veterinarians performed a minor operation. “The snake was trapped inside a beer can, due to which it sustained injuries in the process of trying to get out of it. We expect it to be sent to the wild in a day or two,” said the veterinarian involved in the operation. The founder of Snake Helpline has appealed to people to crush disposable cans after use so snakes won’t get stuck inside in search of food. We’re certain that’s where Anheuser-Busch got the idea for King Cobra Malt Liquor… Seen on a T-shirt: “There are 13 minerals that are essential for human life AND they can all be found in beer! Coincidence?” We think not…

MillerCoors has deceptively marketed and sold its Coors Light beer, the second most popular beer in the U.S., as being exclusively brewed in the Rocky Mountains, when in reality it is made in other breweries nowhere near the Rockies, a class action suit claims. Plaintiff Joaquin Lorenzo says that Coors beers have always been advertised as being “brewed with pure Rocky Mountain spring water.” Sure, the Coors brand’s original brewery was founded in 1873 by Adolph Coors and Jacob Schueler in Golden, Colo., at the base of the Rocky Mountains. The merger with Molson in Canada formed the Molson Coors Brewing Company, which then merged with SABMiller. Lorenzo claims that defendants wrongfully sell the Coors Light beer at a premium price under the representation that it’s brewed in the Rocky Mountains. Lorenzo is seeking compensatory damages on claims of unjust enrichment. Meanwhile, just check the can to see how far from the Rockies that beer was made…

Around the country, yogis are jumping up from savasana and hopping onto bar stools as yoga classes are making their way into breweries. The teaching remains traditional, but the classes attract newbies, especially men, says Beth Cosi, founder of Bendy Brewski in Charleston, S.C., and Memphis, Tenn. “We get the men in the door mostly because it’s in a brewery and they can get a beer afterward. A lot of them come with girlfriends, wives, sisters,” Cosi said. Her classes cost $15 and last 45 minutes. The room is NOT heated to near 100°, and the partnering breweries typically offer a tour of the facility afterwards or the chance to drink a flight of several beers. “It’s a very relaxing place to do yoga,” said Jason Crafts, a 43-year-old IT project manager after a recent class at Raleigh Brewing Company. No navel-gazing or thought control here; the yoga beer classes are all about community. Another beery yoga class in the Salem, Ore., area draws between 75 and 150 people. The trend of yoga-beer partnerships can now be found throughout Florida, New York and California. Beer-maker Dogfish Head created a Namaste beer, a Belgian-style white with dried organic orange flesh and fresh-cut lemongrass. Lululemon, the athletic apparel line, is offering limited-edition yoga pants with Chinook and Lemondrop hops. Let’s hope they are stretch pants…
 

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